Information

Dog Breeds With Goatees, Beards, and Mustaches


Adrienne is a certified dog trainer, behavior consultant, former veterinarian assistant, and author of "Brain Training for Dogs."

If you thought goats and guys were the only animals to boast chin hair, think again. That little tuft of facial hair sprouts from the snouts of some of man's best friends.

If you're looking for a dog who sports a fashionable goatee, you'll be happy to learn that several dog breeds not only have goatees but may have mustaches, too.

As fascinating as these pooches are, consider though that that facial hair needs a little bit of TLC.

The following breeds boast a goatee and some even have mustaches. Of course, these are just a few of the many breeds with beards.

If you are considering showing your dog make sure you read the breed standard carefully. Those beards need to be tidy and kept well in order.

Schnauzers

Meet the schnauzers. These handsome dogs come in three sizes: miniature, standard and giant. Regardless of size, they all boast thick whiskers, a walrus-like mustache, and that irresistible beard.

Special care is mandatory: Water, food, and slobber can easily cause the goatee to become discolored, so you must wipe down and dry the beard at least once a day.

Brushing the beard is also helpful in removing any food remnants and preventing these dudes from becoming smelly or unhealthy.

Bearded Collies

If you ever wondered, yes, a goatee comes at a price: extra care and grooming. If you're a clean freak, know what you'll be getting into before getting a bearded collie.

When he drinks, his beard will absorb water, which will inevitably drip all over your immaculate floors after he walks away.

When he eats, his beard will absorb food, which will get dirty and smelly and will inevitably get you dirty, too, as he comes close to you for some cuddling.

Airedale Terriers

Cleaning up the floors after drinking and cleaning up the goatee after eating may not seem like that big of a deal, but expect some extra cleaning if your bearded dog loves to spend time outdoors.

Airedale terriers love the outdoors and digging and romping in the yard. That beard in the meanwhile collects dirt, debris, and even the occasional burr.

Cleaning it up after outings will help bring back this breed's majestic looks.

Yorkshire Terriers

These lovable pooches have shiny, silky coats and will grow goatees if the hair under the chin is allowed to grow unchecked.

Because Yorkies are small and fit well under furniture, their coats and beards may work better than your average feather duster in collecting dust bunnies. It's up to you to decide how long you want the beard to grow.

In the conformation ring, you may see it touch the floor, but most owners find a 4–6-inch beard ideal.

Lhasa Apso

For a good reason, one of the Lhasa Apso titles is the "Bearded Lion Dog of Tibet." Unlike the lion, this breed sports a long, fluent goatee rather than a mane.

The whiskers and long beard, which often boasts tips darker than the rest of the body, gives him his unique character and regal appearance.

While it's true that the coat and head furnishings take quite a while to grow long, it's well worth the wait once this dignified fellow shows his stuff and looks apso-lutely stunning on the show ring.

Other Bearded Dogs

These are just a few of the many dogs boasting goatees, beards, and mustaches.

Other breeds include the Australian Silky Terrier, the Berger des Pyrenees, the Puli, the Polish Lowland Sheepdog, the Coton de Tulear, the Tibetan Terrier, and the Maltese.

© 2013 Adrienne Farricelli

Jean Terman on July 30, 2017:

Sealyham Terriers also have beards these days.

Adrienne Farricelli (author) on July 12, 2017:

Andrea Dee, go to Google, type "google images" and then type "lhasa apso grooming". You will see several haircuts for the breed like lion cuts, puppy cuts etc. Select the style you like and ask your groomer if she/he can do that. It may be best to keep the whiskers intact, as some dogs act odd after their whiskers are groomed. Good luck!

Andrea-Dee on July 10, 2017:

I love my baby Lhasa Apso. I did not adopt her on the basis of her breed. I like the way my Baby looks, without mustache or beard. When I have her groomed, can I ask for (not only NO LONG-TO-THE-FLOOR coat, but also...) clipped back moustache, beard, and eyebrows? Thanks for your responses.

Kari on February 06, 2013:

We have a Miniature Schnauzer and his beard looks nothing like the guy you have in the picture here. (So pretty.) When we first got him he had an adorable little puffy beard, but now it is usually messy even after a comb - he's just too busy. But, we love his messy beard because it adds personality to him.

Adrienne Farricelli (author) on February 02, 2013:

My neighbor's Schnauzer squeezed through our fence the other day and had a dirty beard and mustache. The evening later I found our trash can tipped over and apparently that little stinker ate all the leftover spaghetti and sauce. Wasn't hard to tell who was to blame, lol! But with such a cute face, I couldn't hold a grudge. I actually called his owner to ask if he was OK and didn't get a tummy ache! I love schnauzers!

Natasha from Hawaii on February 02, 2013:

I love schnauzers! A friend of mine has a miniature schnauzers and she's the cutest thing.

Mary Hyatt from Florida on February 02, 2013:

The Queen of our house is a Miniature Schnauzer! I love the breed, although she can be stubborn and very independent. I trim her beard myself to save money, and sometimes I get one side higher than the other. Her hair grows very fast!

Voted UP, and will share.

Eiddwen from Wales on February 02, 2013:

A wonderful hub; I had a little Schnauzer called Pepper for 17 years and oh how I loved the goatee!!!

They are wonderful dogs ;and the eyebrows/goatees do indeed add to their characters.

I loved this one and have to vote up,across and share .

Have a great weekend.

Eddy.

jaydene from Alberta, Canada on February 01, 2013:

ahhh, too cute, makes it fun for dog groomers I would think.

giving them a look to add to their personalities. :)


As you can see, we humans aren’t the only ones donning facial hair. Many dog breeds have mustaches, beards, goatees, or a combination of the three.

While you might be tempted to choose a breed based on appearance alone, it’s also important to consider the dog’s temperament and how it will fit into your existing lifestyle. Fortunately, there are plenty of dog breeds with facial hair, each with its own general personality and care requirements. At the end of the day, you’re sure to find a breed to suits you perfectly!

Do you own any of these bearded or mustached dog breeds? Are there any you think we missed? Let us know in the comments!


Dogs with beards – the Bearded Collie

The Bearded Collie is perhaps the founder of the beardie dog breeds – after all, that signature trademark beard is right there in this dog breed’s name!

In fact, sometimes the Bearded Collie is simply called “the beardie,” which in this case is a term of endearment by enthusiasts.

This dog breed originally hails from Scotland, where it was bred to assist farmers by herding sheep.

They were bred to be independent thinkers – canine leaders who could herd without help from their shepherd, who might realistically be hours away from their sheep dog partner and busy tending to another part of the farm.

Health Issues

The most common health issues that can crop up in Bearded Collies include hip dysplasia (joint malformation), eye issues, and underactive thyroid.

These dogs still work today in some parts of the world, in other areas are stars in the show ring, and still in other parts of the world they enjoy an active life with their human families.


Around the world, November becomes Movember as guys unite to Grow their Mo and raise awareness for men’s health issues. But while these dudes can lose the stubble and revert to clean-shaven at the end of the month, not all moustaches and beards are intended to be that temporary. In fact, for several of our four-legged friends it’s a distinguishing feature that sets them apart from all other pooches. So who are these bearded four-legged buddies with the Fu Manchus? Check out our Top 10 List of bearded dog breeds.

Of course we kick off our list of bearded dog breeds with the pooch that not only sports the growth but bears the name. This laddie was bred for herding, hails from Scotland and is one of the oldest breeds in Britain. His long, coarse outer coat repels wind, snow and rain while his handsome beard just looks super cool. When it comes to keeping this doggio nice and clean, here are a few steps to remember:

  1. Groom regularly!
  2. Use professional tools for management.
  3. Line brushing–brush from bottom-up in layers.
  4. Do NOT forget conditioner!
  5. Keep track of what products work best.
  6. Dry with ambient air.

(Photo credit: Bildagentur Zoonar GmbH/Shutterstock.com)

This spunky little pooch with the dramatic blue and tan coat has attitude galore! In spite of his tiny size, he wears his ‘stash with pride and dignity – even when he’s unceremoniously tucked into someone’s handbag. When grooming your little dynamo, you’ll want to remember that it will be near impossible to brush his hair when it’s wet. PRO TIP: Always brush the beard on your Yorkie before you bathe! Start from his head and neck and move back to his body, legs, chest and then tail. Brush gently, and until his beard and body hair are nice and straight. THEN bath time will be so much easier!

(Photo credit: dien/Shutterstock.com)

Want a lap dog that makes you chuckle every time he looks up at you? This is the pooch for you. Also known as a chrysanthemum dog because of his unruly facial hair, he adores hanging with his human pack and proving that in spite of his lightweight physique, he can sport a beard with the best of them. That said–looking as adorable as he does takes effort, and you’ll want to be sure to follow a consistent grooming schedule for the beard. Every 1-3 days, you’ll want to brush, depending on how long his coat is. If it’s a longer coat, brush daily for your sanity and his. If more a moderate coat, every 2 days should be okay and if your little Shi likes it short? Brush that beard every 3 days. Brush before you bathe, by the way, which you should do about every 3 weeks or so. (Photo credit: Jagodka/Shutterstock.com)

Now this boy knows how to wear a beard! Whether giant, standard or miniature this extroverted terrier’s iconic walrus beard and chiseled good looks make him matinee idol material in the world of dogs. Am I wrong? Be sure to give his beard a good brush every 5-7 days, depending on length, as these sweeties are prone to knots and mats if you don’t. (Photo credit: Frank11/Shutterstock.com)

You’d never guess this fun-loving dog with the need for play and a passion for getting into mischief was originally bred to work on English farms. Today this dashing dog with the sculpted beard and dramatic profile is more likely found goofing off with his human pack. These lovelies need to be fully groomed at least four times a year in order to remove dead coat and stimulate fresh and new healthy coat. Their beards are as unique as they are so be mindful of brushing to keep mats out and bacteria-free (as they like to really get into what they’re eating!

(Photo credit: Digital Deliverance/Shutterstock.com)

Seriously! While this poufy little Wookie look-alike appears to be of the pampered pooch variety, he was originally bred as a ratter and lived as a street dog in Belgium. With this school-of-hard-knocks background, it’s no wonder he wears his massive ‘stash with an air of self-importance. And since they’re so stately looking, you’ll want to keep these classy pups looking good in the beard department too. The best way to do so is comb regularly with a small, metal comb. If you don’t they look downright homeless, and their hair can get really coarse. Use a bristle brush and metal tooth comb for best beards!

(Photo credit: Okssi/Shutterstock.com)

Nope, not a lot of dignity with this pooch’s facial growth. This beloved terrier loves to wear his food after a big meal – most notably in his beard – then wipe it on your pant leg, sofa, the closest chair… Yes, his beard becomes his own personal paintbrush.

Not to mention that brushing his beard can make him look like a big, old fluffball! Breeders prefer these doggos to be combed through daily with a medium-toothed comb. This gets rid of the last meal, cuts down on tangles and keeps them from looking like they ate a bag of cotton balls.

(Photo credit: Denis Babenko/Shutterstock.com)

This serious-minded little Scot with the independent streak and determined profile was bred to track vermin back in the day. While he can still give the cat a good work-out he’s more likely to enjoy a good walk with his people and of course having his iconic chin scruff trimmed and looking dapper. You’ll want to brush at least once or twice a week, and you’ll want to brush that beard hair forward for the bestest locks looks.

(Photo credit: Ondrej Prosicky/Shutterstock.com)

Arrrrr, matey! This poufy little dog with the beady dark eyes and dramatic mustachio hails from Madagascar and was thought to have been brought over on pirate ships! No wonder he loves swimming! In spite of his bounty of fur, he isn’t a big shedder and is known to just treasure his fluffy mustache! Just make sure you’re using a large-toothed comb for brushing or you may end up looking like you’ve got a field of cotton at the end of that leash! (Photo credit: Andreas Zerndl/Shutterstock.com)

Finishing up our bearded dog breeds list is a unique looking pooch dates back to the 1400s and is traditionally clipped to resemble a lion (yes!) complete with bracelets of fur around his ankles, a poof at the end of his tail and of course the distinctive furry ruff around his face. While his body is regularly shaved, that beard is forever! Just use a wide-toothed comb or pin brush and here’s a PRO tip: add a bit of conditioner after each bath to the beard and food just slides right off!


Cesky Terrier

If you adore the active and playful natures of terriers, the cesky terrier will not disappoint. The fun-loving small terrier is a wonderful family companion and an effective watchdog. In 1949, the cesky terrier was created when Frantisik Horak, a hunter and Scottish terrier breeder of the Czech Republic, bred one of his Scottish terriers with a Sealyham terrier. Horak's goal was to develop a dog with the Scottish terrier's hunting capabilities, the Sealyham's personality and a coat that would not mimic the Sealyham's impractical white hue. Cesky terriers were bred to hunt pheasants, ducks, rabbits, foxes and wild boars in the Bohemian forests. The cesky terrier made its debut in the United States during the 1980s. In 2011, the American Kennel Club recognized the cesky terrier as a member of the terrier group.

The Cesky Terrier, also known as the Bohemian terrier, is a short-legged dog with a long body. Ceskies have wedge-shaped heads and bushy eyebrows, beards and mustaches. They have long silky coats that are often trimmed along the back. The coat needs to be trimmed regularly and the remaining long hair needs to be brushed often. The small cesky terrier stands 10 to 13 inches tall at the shoulder and weighs 16 to 22 pounds. The dog is long in body with short legs, ears that drop downward and a straight tail that spans seven to eight inches in length. The coat grows long and is slightly wavy. It is traditionally clipped to be short over most of the dog's body and long on the forehead, legs and the abdomen. Longer locks are also left on the chin, giving the dog a typical terrier beard. The coat comes in various shades of gray from platinum to charcoal, and markings of white, cream, silver, tan or yellow may be present.

Personality

The Cesky Terrier is a playful, active and friendly terrier that is a little less nervous than most terriers. They are usually easygoing and calm, well-mannered and loyal. They are friendly towards children, as well as other pets. This dog breed could be reserved around strangers, at times. Sometimes their terrier temperaments are triggered and they get stubborn and feisty. They have moderate exercise needs that will be satisfied with romps or daily walks. Like any terrier, the cesky terrier is an active dog that loves to play, hunt, exercise and dig. Cesky terriers excel on agility courses. They are alert, wary of strangers and they are not shy about barking, a combination that makes them dependable watchdogs. Cesky terriers are intelligent and obedient, but they can be strong-willed, which can sometimes prove to be challenging when it comes to training. With families, including those with children and other dogs, the cesky terrier is a loving and loyal companion. The little dog is a good candidate for apartment life, but long walks and daily exercise are essential to work off some of its energy.

Breed Characteristics

Cesky Terrier Build Information

The Cesky Terrier, also known as the Bohemian terrier, is a short-legged dog with a long body. Ceskies have wedge-shaped heads and bushy eyebrows, beards and mustaches. They have long silky coats that are often trimmed along the back. The coat needs to be trimmed regularly and the remaining long hair needs to be brushed often. The small cesky terrier stands 10 to 13 inches tall at the shoulder and weighs 16 to 22 pounds. The dog is long in body with short legs, ears that drop downward and a straight tail that spans seven to eight inches in length. The coat grows long and is slightly wavy. It is traditionally clipped to be short over most of the dog's body and long on the forehead, legs and the abdomen. Longer locks are also left on the chin, giving the dog a typical terrier beard. The coat comes in various shades of gray from platinum to charcoal, and markings of white, cream, silver, tan or yellow may be present.

Behaviour and Personality

The Cesky Terrier is a playful, active and friendly terrier that is a little less nervous than most terriers. They are usually easygoing and calm, well-mannered and loyal. They are friendly towards children, as well as other pets. This dog breed could be reserved around strangers, at times. Sometimes their terrier temperaments are triggered and they get stubborn and feisty. They have moderate exercise needs that will be satisfied with romps or daily walks. Like any terrier, the cesky terrier is an active dog that loves to play, hunt, exercise and dig. Cesky terriers excel on agility courses. They are alert, wary of strangers and they are not shy about barking, a combination that makes them dependable watchdogs. Cesky terriers are intelligent and obedient, but they can be strong-willed, which can sometimes prove to be challenging when it comes to training. With families, including those with children and other dogs, the cesky terrier is a loving and loyal companion. The little dog is a good candidate for apartment life, but long walks and daily exercise are essential to work off some of its energy.

Activity Level:Moderately active
Affection Level:Affectionate
Kid Friendliness:Friendly

Appearance

The coat of a cesky terrier needs to be brushed twice a week to prevent tangling and matting, and monthly trimming will be necessary to maintain the cesky terrier's characteristic appearance. The beard is a catchall for food and water, so clean the beard after the dog eats and drinks. Inspect the ears each week, and keep them clean and dry to prevent an ear infection. Combining tooth brushing with the coat brushing routine will be helpful in maintaining overall health.

Shedding:Little
Grooming:High Maintenance

Cesky Terrier Common Health Conditions

Cesky terriers live an average lifespan of 10 to 15 years. This breed is essentially healthy. One health condition that has been noted in cesky terriers comes from its Sealyham terrier background, and this is an eye problem called lens luxation. Scottie cramp, a condition from the Scottish terrier side of the cesky terrier's foundation, causes problems with mobility and has been noted in some cesky terriers.


The Schnauzer is a breed that’s so cherished that they made it in three varieties, miniature, standard and giant. The standard type was originally bred as a versatile farm dog and found work in ratting and guarding. Boasting arched eyebrows and a moustache and beard, this wire-haired dog breed possesses an almost regal appearance and when paired with their intelligent personality, you’ll soon see why they’re so popular! Also, due to their stiff, wiry coats they tend to shed very little and don’t smell too much.

Scottish Terriers are very terrier-like in the way that they’re excellent watchdogs and possess a powerful bark, despite their small stature. Created to hunt badgers and foxes, these are keen vermin hunters so prepare for lots of holes in your garden! This wire-haired terrier breed has two coats, a topcoat that’s hard and wiry and an undercoat which is soft and dense. You’ll need to carry out weekly grooming with this breed, but regular bathing isn’t recommended as they’re prone to dry skin.


Watch the video: How to Cut a Dogs Hair? BASIC GROOMING Tutorial (July 2021).