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The Top 10 Signs Your Dog May Be Sick (and What You Can Do About It)


Overview
As is the case with people, a dog’s health changes with age. Unfortunately, our pets age much faster than we do.

Symptoms
Regardless of your dog’s age, you play a key role in helping her combat illness and remain as healthy as possible. Remember, your dog cannot describe symptoms to you, but she can show you signs of disease. Awareness of the signs of the most common diseases is one way to help reduce your pet’s risk of being affected by them. It’s a little scary to consider that at least 10% of pets that appear healthy to their owners and their veterinarians during annual checkups have underlying diseases.1

The top 10 signs that your dog may be ill:

  1. Bad breath or drooling
  2. Excessive drinking or urination
  3. Appetite change associated with weight loss or gain
  4. Change in activity level (e.g., lack of interest in doing things they once did)
  5. Stiffness or difficulty in rising or climbing stairs
  6. Sleeping more than normal, or other behavior or attitude changes
  7. Coughing, sneezing, excessive panting, or labored breathing
  8. Dry or itchy skin, sores, lumps, or shaking of the head
  9. Frequent digestive upsets or change in bowel movements
  10. Dry, red, or cloudy eyes

If your best friend shows symptoms of being ill, you should contact your veterinarian immediately.

Unfortunately, you may not always recognize that your dog is sick. Often, even the most well-intentioned dog owners attribute the subtle signs of disease to aging.

Diagnosis/Treatment
Because signs of disease are not always obvious, your veterinarian may recommend preventive care testing as part of your dog’s annual exam.

Preventive care testing often includes the following:

  • Chemistry and electrolyte tests to evaluate internal organ status and ensure your dog isn't dehydrated or suffering from an electrolyte imbalance
  • Tests to identify if your pet may have heartworm, tick-borne or other infectious diseases
  • A complete blood count to rule out blood-related conditions
  • Urine tests to screen for urinary tract infection and other disease and to evaluate the ability of the kidneys to concentrate urine
  • A thyroid test to determine if the thyroid gland is producing too little thyroid hormone
  • An ECG to screen for an abnormal heart rhythm, which may indicate underlying heart disease

Additional tests may be added on an individual basis. Your veterinarian will recommend the right course for your best friend.

Prevention
Preventive care screening not only helps to detect disease in its earlier stages, when it is most likely to respond to treatment, it also can help you avoid significant medical expense and risk to your dog’s health if an illness goes undetected. In addition, by establishing your pet’s normal baseline laboratory values during health, your veterinarian—and you—can more easily see when something is wrong with your pet. Annual screening is the best preventive medicine!

For more information about preventive testing, contact your veterinarian—your best resource for information about the health and well-being of your pet.

If you have any questions or concerns, you should always visit or call your veterinarian – they are your best resource to ensure the health and well-being of your pets.

Reference:

1. Rehm M. Seeing double. Vet Econ. 2007;48(10):40–48.

If you have any questions or concerns, you should always visit or call your veterinarian – they are your best resource to ensure the health and well-being of your pets.


12 dog breeds most protective of their owner

Akitas have a large build (just look at the size of their heads!) which makes them powerful. If you get them comfortable with family and friends early on in life, they'll know who to be goofy and playful.

Though smaller than some of the other guard dogs, Appenzeller Sennenhunds still make a great pick due to their agility and energy. They were originally farm dogs, so their intelligence and obedience will impress your whole family.

These large, muscular dogs are a cross between Bulldogs and Mastiffs. Bullmastiffs are a great walking companion, but leave them at home when you go running.

These dogs are known for the unique patterns and spots on their coats. If you aren't sure if you can handle raising a puppy, Catahoula Leopard dogs start acting like adults by 10-months-old.

These massive dogs know exactly how to respond if they sense a threat to your house or family members, so don't underestimate their fluffiness. The Caucasian Shepherd dogs are a great option if you have kids and other animals, because they're loving and careful around their family.

Don't let a Doberman's sleek body fool you — they're strong, fast, and brave. They require a lot of exercise, so be prepared to go on long walks with your buddy.

Estrelas are thought to be one of the oldest breeds in Portugal, where these dogs are named after a range of mountains. They're super gentle and protective, so they'll fit in with a tight-knit family.

German Shepherds are one of the most common breeds for police dogs, but they're just as common as pets. They'll protect your house from intruders, but they're so loyal that they will form a strong bond with you.

The Giant Schnauzer is basically a stronger, larger version of its standard counterpart. Be prepared to spend a decent amount of time grooming them, because that thick coat of hair requires regular brushing — they've got a beard, after all!

Puli dogs were originally meant for herding, so they learn fast and can easily outsmart any predators. Don't let their silly appearance fool you!

This type of guard dog requires someone to be close with, so you won't want to leave them alone for long periods of time. Romanian Mioritic Shepherd dogs are loving and kind enough to be your closest bud, but they will bark and get aggressive if they encounter strangers they don't trust.

If you know anyone with a Rottweiler, chances are that you've seen them be gentle around their owners but intimidating when it comes to strangers. To keep them on top of their game, be sure to socialise your Rottie with other people and dogs in addition to taking them to training classes.


Final words about using a “when to put your dog down checklist”

When you get a pet, you commit to give your dog all the love and care they need. You open your heart and home to a new family member.

Thus, when it’s time to say goodbye, it hurts. But sometimes, to show how much you love someone, you have to make the hardest decisions. And knowing when to let your dog go is one of the most difficult.

Use this when to put your dog down checklist to help you recognize the signs, so you’ll know when it is the right time to say goodbye to a beloved pet.

One last tip, if it’s clear that letting go is the best option, do so without any regrets. Be there with your dog during his final moments if possible, work with a vet who offers home pet euthanasia. Being able to say goodbye in your own home will be easier for both of you.

After your dog dies, be prepared to grieve. Over time, you will heal and move on. It will help to create a memorial for your dog by making a donation or commissioning special artwork. Fortunately, all your precious moments and memories of your beloved dog will stay with you forever!

Elizabeth Price is a former psychology student at Montclair State University who is still eager to research almost any topic. She works as an academic advisor and blog writer at EssayPro, an urgent essay writing service. You can reach her on Twitter or contact her via email. Elizabeth is a contributor to Native Advertising Institute, LearnWoo, and TaskPigeon.


Northern Virginia Dog Training Blog

Nowadays it has become more important than ever to adopt a pet instead of buying it. Thousands of helpless animals are put to death every year because they are ownerless. If you have your heart set on a puppy of your own there is no reason not to call around shelters and find some puppies that way… however if you absolutely must buy your new pup from an unfamiliar source you can still do your part to help out. Here’s how.

Puppy Farms are more commonplace than you would think. Puppy Farms exist the whole world over. Why are they so bad? Puppy Farms (also called Puppy Mills) keep numerous dogs in cramped conditions with poor sanitation and little food. The dogs are often kept in tiny cages, are fed whatever the owners can spare and are bred relentlessly with the sole aim of making their owners a profit.

To help you spot potential Puppy Farmers we put together a helpful list of points to look out for. If you suspect you have found a rogue breeder then you ought to report them to the relevant authorities.

Some ways to tell if your puppy was raised at a puppy mill:

1. The most obvious sign of a Puppy Farmer is that they will not be able to produce either of the pups parents. No parents means the dog has already been separated – usually too early. If your breeder won’t let you meet your pups mom and dad (at least the mom) then read on and see if they meet any other criteria.

2. The second thing to ask is if the parents were vaccinated. If the mom is up-to-date on shots. If not, there may be a distinct possibility that this breeder doesn’t care much for their animals. They should know this information, and if they don’t know both parents bear in mind that they therefore cannot be entirely sure of the lineage.

3. You will be able to tell a lot about where the breeder meets you. Purchasing from a reputable dealer you will often find you are invited to their home. If the address is a warehouse in an industrial estate don’t bother going. A dodgy breeder might also want to bring the puppy to you or meet at a neutral spot, so be wary of that, as well.

4. Once you meet your breeder, ask them specifically how many breeds they own. If it is more than two (or three at a maximum) then the chances are that they are a Puppy Farmer. Puppy Mills often carry as many breeds as possible, reputable breeders tend to keep their dogs at home and in comfort, and more than three breeds is hard work for a household.

5. Ask how many pups are for sale. A normal litter is between five and eight puppies (with exceptions), if there are eighteen (etc) puppies for sale then you know that the breeder has multiple pregnant dogs from different breeds, a clear indicator of a Puppy Farmer.

6. Ask what age the puppy is. Puppies shouldn’t be taken away from their mothers until “at least six weeks,” but eight weeks is recommended (and in some cases, state law). If the puppy is younger than that and the parent is nowhere in sight then alarm bells should be ringing.

7. Hygiene can be another clue. A new puppy smells much like a new baby. A puppy from a Farm will smell like a kennel. They will often be dirty in appearance and their coat is unlikely to be shiny.

8. Paperwork is important. If you are buying a breeder’s dog they will provide you with paperwork assuring you the dog is a registered pedigree. If you are not buying a pedigree of course you cannot get this certificate – however – a good breeder should care where their pups go. Your breeder should draw up some kind of paperwork that states what happens if the dog needs to be returned etc. They will often also want to call you to check in. A good breeder wants to know their dog has gone to a good home. So, look for a contract and the breeder questioning YOU (fenced in yard, do you have a home or an apartment, etc). A Puppy Farmer is a lot less likely to care. If their only concern is that you have the money and no other questions, contracts, or applications, it is more than likely a puppy mill or backyard breeder. Also, they should care with pairing you with the RIGHT dog.

9. If you are buying from a pet shop make sure to inquire about the dogs parentage. A good shop will keep records, a bad shop might be dealing in out-of-State Puppy Farmers. Always ask. In general, you should shy away getting dogs from Pet Shops, as many of them are obtained from puppy mills.

10. Deception – if you think you are being deceived then don’t buy. Do a little research. For example if you want a small dog learn which breed of small dog specifically you would like. If you then go to a breeder armed with this information you are less likely to be fooled. Puppy Farmers are notorious for telling you what you want to hear and will make all sorts of wild assurances to make the sale. It is hard to tell when you are being lied to, but much easier if you know exactly what to look for in your prospective pup!

There are other things you can look for. If the dog seems unhealthy in any way then a good breeder will know what is wrong with them and be able to tell you how to go about fixing it. A good breeder will also have a reliable phone number, and possible multiple ways to be contacted – not true of a Puppy Farmer, who will often change numbers to avoid angry retaliation from clients. Small clues you might look out for in the dogs behavior include being afraid of humans, a generally nervous disposition and anything else that indicates that the animal has been kept in dark or cramped conditions. Puppy Farm pups are often kept in wire cages and you might see signs of this on their paws.

In general, be wary of bad breeders and report anything suspicious until no dog has to endure such a terrible life.

The website, Bailing out Benji has a solid list of known puppy mills broken down by state: https://bailingoutbenji.com/puppy-mill-maps/. Generally, you will be able to see a correlation between heavy Amish communities and known puppy mills in the area. For example, the 3 largest Amish counties in the United States, are also the 3 largest counties in those states with known puppy-mills. So, not all Amish run puppy mills however, this is why it’s important to do your research!

So, if you are going to get a puppy from the Amish, Pet Stores, or unknown breeders: do your research! Ask for references, ask to meet the parents, meet at the place the dogs actually live, see the living conditions of the dogs, and their appearance of health!

If not, you could be stuck with a dog filled with a life of behavior or health issues.

If you have any questions, contact a trainer or vet near you to see if they have more information!


Watch the video: NEVER DO THIS TO YOUR DOG! (July 2021).